Repetitive Strain Injury Compensation Claims

Repetitive Strain Injury is a term which is commonly used to cover a variety of different conditions which do not arise from a specific event or accident but develop over a period of time.

One of the most common references to repetitive strain injuries is in relation to work related upper limb disorders (also referred to as WRULDs). These develop as a result of exposure to rapid repetitive and forceful movements over a regular period of time. This in turn causes excessive strain on the soft tissues and tendons in the arm.

There are a variety of different work related upper limb disorders including:

Poorly designed work stations or excessive keyboard work can lead to the development of upper limb disorders in certain circumstances.

Carpal Tunnel Syndrome and Tennis Elbow or Golfers Elbow (correctly termed Epicondylitis) can also arise from excessive work activities, although the link between repetitive work and these conditions is often disputed.

The term ‘repetitive strain injury’ has also been applied to back and neck pain which develops over a period of time following strenuous activity and which is not linked to a particular accident. Claims for personal injury compensation arising in such circumstances are often difficult to pursue. This is because it often proves difficult to obtain medical evidence which can establish a link between the back or neck pain and the activities undertaken at work.

At Sintons our industrial disease specialists have a wealth of experience in pursuing personal injury compensation claims arising from repetitive strain injuries.

All personal injury claims are pursued on a No Win No Fee basis so you can rest assured that there is no financial risk.

To begin a personal injury compensation claim or obtain further advice with no obligation contact Sintons 24/7.

Freephone 24/7 0800 051 7998
From a mobile 0333 005 7998

Request a Callback

Please fill out the form below and one of our specialists will contact you. (all fields are required).

Video Call Us
Polski Polski